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Unborn Lives Matter – Until they're born, of course


RTL Unborn Lives Matter Chalk

As I was walking through red square two weeks ago, I came across a chalking that read: “Unborn Lives Matter.” Here are my thoughts:

Tiara Richmond. Tamir Rice. Alphonza Watson. Chay Reed. Chyna Doll Dupree.

If there is one thing that white right-winged individuals love other than being racist, it is co-opting our movements and language - specifically that of the Black Lives Matter movement (or the Movement for Black Lives). It is not only disrespectful, but it is also ignorant and inaccurate to chalk “unborn lives matter,” as it does not even align with the movement’s politics or mission. In fact, the Black Lives Matter movement partners with Trust Black Women who share beliefs on reproductive justice. Their statement affirming their alliance reads, ”we launch this statement of solidarity with Black Lives Matter to affirm that the work that we've been doing for 20 years for Black women's reproductive freedom and justice is connected to the movement for Black lives.” So, there’s that.

Tanisha Anderson. Philando Castile. Yvette Smith. Miriam Carey.

To my knowledge, the event most - tangentially - related to race that Georgetown Right to Life has held was on September 6th, 2016. The event was titled “Civil Rights for the Unborn”, and featured a talk from Alveda King, who RTL made sure to note is the niece of Martin Luther King, Jr. However, let me tell you about Alveda King: she is an anti-LGBTQ extremist. She believes natural disasters are the result of "homosexual marriage" and abortion. With that being said, it is no surprise that Georgetown Right to Life would invite - and tokenize - a homophobic woman to reinforce and spread a platform of hate on campus. Did Georgetown Right to Life think about how the queer students would feel with King’s attendance? The answer to the preceding question is apparent seeing that she was invited. (To be transparent, the answer is no - RTL did not consider the safety of queer students on Georgetown’s campus.)

Miriam Carey. Sherrell Faulkner. Darnisha Harris. Rodney James Hess